Tag Archives for " underground marketing "

3 years ago

Write an article in a tech magazine

Write an article in a tech magazine about the hard drives used to store your data.

Some MarketingHacks are totally unplanned – like a tweet that lets you recognize a unique opportunity (MarketingHack #8). Others require months of meticulous planning and tons of hard work – like putting together a world-class event to screen your movie (MarketingHack #11).

Then there are others that fall into your lap: Earlier this year I got an email which started off like this: “PHOTO Digital Video magazine/Portable Storage Buyer’s Guide/Editorial request for February issue (SUBMISSION DEADLINE TODAY!)

Preparation meets opportunity

Cinematographer takes ioSafe drives to extremesYou guys know I love ioSafe drives – I’ve got half a dozen I use (some are fireproof – other’s just waterproof) – you know I take my data integrity seriously. Well the good people at ioSafe sent out that email asking me for help. “Can you write a review about our drives?

Mind you this is not my first interaction with them. They’ve sponsored workshops of mine, I write about how much I love their product on my blog, and they’ve seen me post a photo working in the jungles of Peru on social media featuring their drives.

iosafeBack to the email – Brett from ioSAFE asks me if I could write a product review about my experience with the rugged drives. These little guys are tanks: crush proof to 2,500 pounds, drop proof to 10 feet and waterproof at 30 feet for three days. Think of it as a permanent LifeProof case for your hard drive.

Write quick, its due tomorrow

The catch is the article I need to write is due the next day. No problem. Since I’ve written about the drives before I know the specs, I know what I want to say – and they know I love the drives.  30 minutes later the post is written, include the photo and it’s send back to Brett. Hey, I’ll take press where I get to write about my work anytime. I’m happy to help. And Brett’s happy to have a review in to the magazine on time. Another part of the marketing puzzle is complete.

An unexpected bonus

In fact, he’s so happy he sends me one of my favorite drives as a thank you. A welcome and unexpected gesture.  Check out the article titled “Cinematographer takes ioSafe Rugged Portable to Extremes

4 years ago

National Geographic – Do you recognize that brand? Marketing Hack #22

License your work to National Geographic and other well known brands.

“National Geographic has aired my footage.”

National Geographic brings great name recognition.That’s all it takes to convince a potential client, who wants to hire me to produce and film a cooking show. This potential customer has known me for a long time – I’ve created many photographs for them over the years. “But can you shoot video?” was the question.

National Geographic has aired my footage.” I say. That was the end of that discussion. What’s the point you ask? Anytime someone else says that your work is excellent, it’s worth more than you making that statement yourself. That can be as involved as getting a client to allow you to film a customer testimonial or as simple as telling people who your clients are.

Let other brands speak for you

If I tell you that my footage has aired on National Geographic, that I’ve photographed for Mars (the candy company), Harper’s Bazar has published my work, and that I have won international awards for my photography and video work ect. what image comes to your mind?

Compare that with a photographer who’s shot a photo for his aunt, filmed a video for Bob’s bagel barn and the PTA flyer of his school featured his work.

It’s worth more than money

Strive to get your work out there. Look for opportunities that have name recognition – like National Geographic – to bolster your brands reputation. Having a list of household names as clients that you can rattle off, is often worth more than the money you make on the specific shoot. Sometimes it’s exactly those opportunities that call for you working for free or at cost (for the record, I got paid for NatGeo – which makes it even better). Many of these chances come from having an extensive network of people that you work hard to build. This is not a difficult task, but it takes a lot of time and determination to network and keep up these relationships.

Ask for screen credit during your negotiations and don’t be afraid to take a smaller dollar amount, if you can get your name on the piece. My footage has also been used by the BBC and NPR. I’ve also filmed for the Associated Press and CNN (ok so the CNN was a few seconds of B-roll, I shot with a buddy of mine and I wouldn’t use that to apply as a camera man for a news network, but it give my corporate clients a feel for the quality of my work. After all, if I’ve shot for National Geographic, I’m definitely good enough to shoot for my commercial client.)

Next time you get asked to film, photograph, produce or create something at cost or for free, don’t dismiss it outright. Take the time to see how it benefits your network and how you can raise the name recognition of your brand.

 

 

4 years ago

3 tips to make your swag memorable: Marketing Hacks #23

Create memorable swag

Do you like to get swag?

Every body loves free stuff, right? So how do you make your swag stand out? It’s not that tough, if you keep these 3 tips in mind:

  • Make it unique to stand out – how much impact do you think another printed ¢15 pen make? Extra points, if no one else gives this away. Branded USB drives? Great – how many of those have I seen, water bottles with your logo, bags, pens, … been there done that and actually got the T-shirt.
  • Make it good – no one is going to remember anything that is less than great. Good is the new normal. It’s expected, you don’t even need to show up with mediocre. 
  • Make it personal. Give me something unique to me and I’ll keep it way longer than a mass-produced piece of swag. (Read MarketingHack #8: Do something unexpected to remember why I mailed a New York creative the magazine that featured her as a winner along with a hand written note.) I bet she remembers that today.

What does good marketing swag look like?

How do you think local influencers feel, when I hand them a copy of a DVD with ‘On Wings of Hope‘? Let’s see how that stacks up:

  • Pascal Depuhl's award winning documentary short film "On WIngs of Hope" tells the story of a humanitarian flight service in Afghanistan makes a great swag itemIt’s unique – movies are something people don’t expect to get for free. How many movies has a director given to you? How many of those are filmed in Afghanistan? How many are featured in a TEDx talk?
  • It’s won a handful of awards and has played at film festivals, had a great private première that people are still talking about (It’s featured as MarketingHack #11).
  • It gets personalized – I’ll write a note on the DVD liner; we actually designed some space on it to jot a short note with a silver sharpie.

Would you throw that out? Or show it to your friends? If you need to book a photographer to produce a video for you, would the guy that produce an award wining short documentary in Afghanistan come to your mind; especially if you have a personalized DVD he gave you?

How do I create swag that sticks in their mind?

Now I realize, not all of you are going to fly to Afghanistan to produce an award wining, short documentary; if you would, I’d need to come up with something more unique again. Well follow the same criteria I did:

  • Be unique. Take some time to think, but give out swag that is relevant to your business.
    • Only use the best. You’re gonna spend money on producing your swag, you might as well make it great. Less than good will land you in the garbage can
  • Make it personal. It takes you just a few seconds and makes a huge impact on your audience of one. It’s maybe even the most important of the three tips.

I’d love to see what you come up with – show off your best stuff – tweet me @photosbydepuhl and use #MarketingHackSwag.

4 years ago

Marketing Hack #19: Start a discussion in a LinkedIn group

2 ingredients needed to get hired

Last week I got hired by an agency owner. Turns out a branding agency referred me, although I had not worked with them. However a motion graphics shop had referred my work to that branding agency, although I had never worked with them either. We were joking about this on the job–you know what the agency owner told me? “That’s how I got your name, but your website showed me that you can get my job done.”

We all have a website that showcases our work. Extra points for an active blog that gives your target audience a behind the scenes peek at how you work. A vibrant social media presence has never hurt anyone either; so that’s the content side of your business

Where do you find your audience?

Content is only half of the equation. Without an audience, it won’t make a difference – actually that’s not correct – without the right audience it won’t make a difference. So how do you get your name out there? (Mutual friends that introduce you to a Motion Graphics shop, who pass you along to a branding agency, whose owner recommends you to an ad agency is not really a viable business model, in case you were wondering.)

LinkedIn Groups make a great place to find your audienceFinding your target audience is a lot easier today, since everybody is online; which also makes it a lot harder, since all of your competition is online as well. How do you then go about getting your brand out there? One great place are LinkedIn groups.

Everybody is already here

Start a discussion in a LinkedIn group of – and here’s the secret – of people who are potentially looking for your work. I won’t post a discussion in a group devoted to plumbing. That would be a waste of time and would basically be the same as the ad agency owner calling me to fix her leaking water heater. No. She calls me, because I can meet her need for a photographer. Come up with a topic that interests your clients – again it does me no good to start a discussion on water heaters in a group of photo buyers.

Earlier this year I started a discussion asking if personal work mattered to photo editors. It got some great response from members of the group. Do this consistently and you’ll be on their mind, if they are looking for a photographer.

4 years ago

Marketing Hack #18: Write a gear review (or two)

People love to peek behind the scenes and you’re the one who can give them access to your world. Let them peek behind the curtain so to speak and share how you make your images, your movies, your ______________ (fill in the blank with whatever it is that you make).

Part of that creation process is the equipment that we use and as you know, nothing is a stronger validation than a review of a piece of gear created by someone you trust, when you’re looking to acquire a piece of gear.

So whether it’s a review of the hard drives I use on location (ioSafe rocks) – or if it’s talking about the big, solar-powered battery I rely on when I’m shooting off the grid (GoalZero has some incredible products) or reviewing the little one to keep my cell phone topped off (Bushnell makes a cool one).

As an aside, once you’ve written or filmed a review or two and some recommendations, you can go to the equipment manufactures and ask them if they could use a customer testimonial video or guest blog post that’s a review of their products (trust me they love a well written or creatively shot review from one of their customers).

Cinematographer takes ioSafe drives to extremesAnd if you do it often enough, they’ll come to you and ask you to create a review for them, like ioSafe did a few months ago.

You can make the review be a periscope live broadcast or write a blog post about the gear both are great tools to take your audience behind the scene. Remember that your ultimate goal is not only to share from your experience and help people find tools that they may have not known about before; but at the end of the day, you want to let your target audience know, that you are an expert when it comes to utilizing the correct gear for the job.

4 years ago

Marketing Hack #17: Link your postcards to the cloud

MarketingHack 16: Postcards from the cloud

Probably the single most important reason to use Marketing Hacks, is to stand out from the crowded field of visual noise bombards our all the time. Social Media, Email campaigns, TV ads, junk mail, pop up ads, the list goes on and on all clamor for our attention – some are specifically focused on your target audience, others aren’t.

Shock and Awe marketing (with help from the cloud)

How do you stand out? You need a to fire a full broadside at your target market to be seen. A single email, blog post of Facebook status update won’t cut it. It has to be shock and awe marketing, but I’m not talking about content that’s designed specifically to be crude or offensive – I mean your content has to hit your audience on many channels at the same time – Here’s a sneak peek at cutting through the digital clutter from my upcoming blog post I wrote for the American Society of Media Photographers blog strictly business called “How to fire a marketing broadside at your target audience!“:

How do you compete against this onslaught? Go old school (with a twist): send a handwritten post card. Clients appreciate knowing that they weren’t part of an automated campaign, filled in their <FIRST NAME> <LAST NAME> and thanking them for the opportunity to bid on a photography job for <THEIR COMPANY>. A handwritten thanks gets noticed (…) So where’s the twist I mentioned earlier? [Spoiler alert it’s in the cloud] Well on the back of the post card is a link to a landing page on my website, that goes to a web page with the same image, …

You can read about one specific channel I’m using in greater detail now and if that image looks familiar to you you’re right! It featured in Marketing Hack #12 (and you just remembered another shot from my broadside marketing campaign.)

Postcards to the cloud

Connecting postcard to the cloud

I’m a commercial photographer – which means I only shoot B2B and I’m creating a postcard campaign for my business that’s targeted specifically toward small business owners and boutique creative agencies. I wanted to share how I’m automating my snail mail marketing:

This printed mailer is connected to the cloud via custom URL.

I’d specifically love to talk to you about what happens after my customer receives the postcard. Of course it has my URL on the front of the card – actually the face of the card (minus the tagline) is a copy of the front page of my website.

However the real magic happens on the back (which is where we connect to the cloud) – the normal elements are all there – my address, the award the image has won, copyright info – none of that is anything special, however the last paragraph is:

It includes a link to my blog (in human readable form – blog.depuhl.com/product-photo-story), which leads to a landing page specifically designed for this mailer (it also includes the real review that this client posted on LinkedIn):

See the form? It connects to the cloud.

Here’s what it does for my clients

That page is the link between the real world and my online presence. The page captures email address, first and last name, automatically adds those to my email mailing list and returns the client to my blog homepage and writes a personalized email series I wrote about this shoot, with links to these three posts:

– how I plan and estimate product photography shoots

– how I scout the locations for a product shoot

– how I actually photograph one of these productions

These posts include, bts photos, descriptions of apps used, recordings of periscope live streams, a short video of the shoot, ect. (I’m still working on building more content for this series). Ok so that’s what it does for my clients.

Here’s what it does for my business

On my back-end in the cloud, it automatically enters the captured information [email, first name, last name, landing page version] from my email list (MailChimp) to my Customer Relationship Management service (SalesForce) via Zappier automation, which also sends an SMS to my phone letting me know that someone has subscribed via this specific mailer.

In the end my customer gets:

  • the post card with my contact info
  • a personalized interaction with my brand
  • introduced to my blog that talks about photography, cinematography and marketing
  • a personalized email with links to content, that talks about how this image is created

I get:

  • a new subscriber to my list,
  • a new lead for my product photography
  • an alert that someone just signed up

The beauty of this is, that now that this is all set up, it will happen automatically every time a potential customer types that url (blog.depuhl.com/product-photo-story) into their browser and fills out their contact info. This campaign is specifically marketed to current clients I have, who hire me to photograph very simple product photography and need to think about creating photographs that actually tell a story and to small businesses and creative shops that don’t think of me as a photographer, who can create this type of imagery.

The post cards are ordered (VistaPrint is having their semi-annual 50% off sale – one thousand 4 color postcards with b/w print on the back, run about $100.-) the landing page and email auto responder are created and once the cards mail out, it’ll be interesting to see how this campaign performs.

If you want to experience what my customers will see, you can click-through blog.depuhl.com/product-photo-story, and take the journey.

I’d love to hear any comments about how this process worked for you.

 

4 years ago

MarketingHack #16: Be featured as an expert in a book

MarketingHack 16: Loose a book for 2 years

25 Marketing Hacks is a weekly blog series the explores unconventional ways of getting the word out about your work. Traditionally photographers and cinematographers use their portfolios or show reels either in a face-to-face meeting or online to attract new clients. Today I’ll show you how to be featured as an expert in a book that you don’t even have to write.

Become an expert

So yeah, there’s no way around this. You got to become an expert. Clients love to work with an expert in the field, Google loves to find the expert to serve to their users, experts are wanted by everyone. This is the part where you need to put your nose to the grind stone and work hard.

The good news is that you don’t have to become the best expert in the world – after all there’s Featured Expert on videoonly one of those – but you need to become an expert in the eye of the author who is looking for an expert to help teach his readership.

Back up and tell the story from the beginning

Two and a half years ago, I got contacted by Rosh Sillars (@RoshSillars) who was writing a Digital Field guide on the Canon EOS Rebel T5i. He was looking for an expert to give some tips on how to shoot video with the new Rebel. Rosh had asked me to give some practical tips on capturing motion, rather than the technical settings.

I gladly agreed, for one I enjoy helping my friends do well. I also can’t see the downside of being featured in a book as the expert on video. I was in the middle of pulling off my world wide première of my first documentary film (Check out Marketing Hack #11 for why we showed the film at an airport), when I did a quick phone interview with Rosh about video.

It’s kind of a funny story

Rosh finishes the interview, the book gets published and I’m supposed to get a copy from the publisher, but honestly I totally forgot about it, although I did see the page on books.google.com and included a link to that page on my about page. Fast forward to yesterday (2 years after the book got published).